Reasons Why Reasons Why

KNOWLEDGE

Welcome to the Moore Guitars Knowledge Center!

This page is an ever expanding source of information for you to learn more about guitars, gear, and the brands behind the instruments. Have some fun and go exploring through the multiple tabs and pages we have available. This page will be frequently updated and new additions will be added weekly so remember to check in regularly to see what's new.

  • WELCOME
  • PRS INFO
  • TAYLOR INFO
  • FENDER INFO
  • BREEDLOVE INFO
  • BUYER'S GUIDES
  • EXPERT REVIEW
  • PEDALS
  • GLOSSARY

Welcome to the Moore Guitars Knowledge Center!

This page is an ever expanding source of information for you to learn more about guitars, gear, and the brands behind the instruments. Have some fun and go exploring through the multiple tabs and pages we have available. This page will be frequently updated and new additions will be added weekly so remember to check in regularly to see what's new.


INFO

PRS Private Stock Catalog

Breedlove Tonewood Certification

Fender History


BLOGS

Taylor V-Class

A Budget Friend Guitar That Loves to Get Dirty. The PRS SE

Breedlove Guitars - Challenging the Status Quo


Reasons Why to Shop at Moore Guitars

About Moore Guitars

PRIVATE STOCK CATALOG

To learn everything you need to know about the Private Stock program click HERE!


PRS NECK PROFILES EXPLAINED

Here's the "Go-To" page that explains everything about Paul Reed Smith Neck Profiles. Check it out HERE!


PRS MODEL HISTORY

Click HERE to see the history of all the Paul Reed Smith models.


PRS PRIVATE STOCK

Some of the best craftsmanship and creativity comes out of the PRS Private Stock Department. Click HERE to learn about these amazing guitars.


CARE AND MAINTENANCE TIPS

Learn from the Pros at Moore Guitars and the Paul Reed Smith Factory on how to care for your guitar. Click HERE!


PRS SWITCHING POSITIONS

An in-depth Look at the switching positions and configurations on all the Paul Reed Smith Guitars.

Video Included!

Click HERE!


OLD VIDEO PAGE

This page is an old page that we were going to take down but a lot of people still like it, so here you go. Some great performances in here.

Click HERE!

TAYLOR RESTRINGING METHOD

Straight from the luthiers at Taylor Guitars, the Taylor method of restringing your prized acoustic guitar. Click HERE!


An EXTREMELY helpful guide to picking your first, or your next Taylor Guitar. Click HERE to check it out!


Here is a great overview page about the Taylor Bracing System. The amazing tone of Taylor Guitars has been generated from this platform for decades. Click HERE!


Click HERE to see the new and amazing bracing system from Taylor that is revolutionizing the way Taylor Guitars are built and sound!


TAYLOR HUMIDIFICATION GUIDELINES

The luthiers from Taylor Guitars tell us how to keep your acoustic guitar properly hydrated throughout the year. Click HERE!


TAYLOR ES-1 EXPRESSION SYSTEM

Read HERE to learn about the ES (1) Expression System from Taylor Guitars.


TAYLOR ES-2 EXPRESSION SYSTEM

Read HERE to learn about the upgraded ES-2 Expression System from Taylor Guitars.


A GUIDE TO TAYLOR SERIAL NUMBERS

A concise guide to understanding the serial numbering system for Taylor Guitars dating back to the beginning. Click HERE!


TAYLOR GUITARS FACTORY STRINGS

Click HERE to learn about the strings that come on your new Taylor Guitar.  


The amazingly well-designed Taylor Neck is an engineering marvel. Its ease to adjust and its stability make it another feather in Taylor's cap. Click HERE to read about it.


Bob Taylor and Taylor Guitars have always been concerned for the environment. Their efforts are amazing in this respect. Click HERE to see an overview of what they do to save our wonderful planet.


It's taylor like you have never heard before! Click HERE to see and learn everything you need to know about the "Taylor Grand Pacifics" and why they are such amazing guitars!

FENDER DATING AND SERIAL NUMBERS

Here's the "Go-To" page that explains everything about dating your Fender Guitar. No, not that kind of dating...Figuring out the year of your guitar, silly. Check it out HERE!


Here is a quick reference page dedicated to the illustrious history of the Fender Guitar Company. Click HERE!


Fender helps you decide which strings are right for your playing and your guitar. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you decide which stratocaster are right for your playing. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you on how to buy an electric guitar. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you choose the pickup that's right for you. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you to understand what a set up is and why it is important . Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Learn about Fenders great history. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you to understand difference between the Stratocaster and Telecaster. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender compares 7 types of Stratocasters for you. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender describes the difference between gain and volume. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!

Click HERE to learn about how the people at Breedlove source their tonewoods responsibly to help conserve our planet!


Click HERE to learn about how Breedlove makes their already amazing guitars even better with the Patented Sound Optimization System.

VIDEO FOR BEGINNING BUYERS

Check out this video brought to you from Ed Sein. He has 30 years of experience helping people getting started playing guitar.

Click HERE!

 

Welcome to the Expert Review section. Here you will find our light hearted yet very informative videos covering everything you need to know about the products that come through our store.  

  • PRS
  • TAYLOR
  • FENDER
  • BREEDLOVE

SE Paul's Guitar

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS SE Paul's Guitar


SE Tonare Series

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS SE Tonare Series


John Mayer Silver Sky

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS John Mayer Silver Sky


PRS Private Stock McCarty Doubleneck 594 Semi-Hollow

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS Private Stock McCarty Doubleneck 594 Semi-Hollow


Archon 50W EL34 Head

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS Archon 50W EL34 Head

Taylor 717E Builders Edition Grand Pacific

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor 717E Builders Edition Grand Pacific


Taylor 114E

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor 114E


Taylor Grand Pacific Demo

CLICK HERE to see Taylor Guitars' Rich Casciato demo the Grand Pacific series


TAYLOR 814 CE

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor 814CE


Taylor GS Mini

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor GS Mini

Jimmy Page Mirror Telecaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender Jimmy Page Mirror Telecaster


American Professional Stratocaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender American Professional Stratocaster


American Elite Stratocaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender American Elite Stratocaster


Eric Johnson Thinline Stratocaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender Eric Johnson Thinline Stratocaster


American Elite Thinline Telecaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender American Elite Telecaster Thinline

Breedlove Oregon Concertina E Myrtlewood

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove Oregon Concertina E Myrtlewood 

 


Breedlove Oregon Concert E Myrtlewood

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove Frontier Concert Mahogany


Breedlove Premier Concert CE Moore LTD

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove Premier Concert CE Moore LTD


Breedlove USA Concertina E Mahogany

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove USA Concertina E Mahogany


Breedlove Premier Jumbo

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about theBreedlove Premier Jumbo

 

In this section of the Moore Guitars Knowledge Page we are discussing the different types of guitar effects pedals. There are many different types, and we are going to dive into them one by one. If you have any further questions feel free to give us a call or live chat us.

 

  • GAIN EFFECTS
  • TIME EFFECTS
  • FILTER EFFECTS
  • MODULATION EFFECTS
  • VOLUME EFFECTS
  • PITCH EFFECTS
  • COMPRESSOR
  • NOISE GATE
  • OTHER

Distortion Pedals

 

Let's start of with probably the most widely used type of effects pedals out there, distortion! If you are really wanting to make your tone crunchy and more aggressive distortion pedals are definitely the place to start. These pedals give you the ability to heavily clip the clean signal that you are running through your amp and give you the high-gain tone that you would hear in your favorite heavy rock or metal band.


Overdrive Pedals

Another very popular type of pedal that you will see on nearly every pedal board is the overdrive pedal. These pedals are another form of gain pedal like the distortion and fuzz pedals. These pedals provide the natural distortion you would normally hear in your amp when you turn up the gain to the point that the signal is clipping. Overdrive pedals are great if you are wanting to have a natural-sounding distorted sound without damaging your hearing or equipment. Overdrive pedals generally provide less clipping than regular distortion pedals.


Boost Pedals

Boost pedals add more gain to your guitar’s signal before it gets to the input stage on your amplifier. These pedals are great if you are trying to get a little more “oomph” out of your guitar without adding distortion to the signal or making any EQ adjustments.

 


Fuzz Pedal

The last type of gain pedal that we are going to talk about is the fuzz pedal. These pedals give you the highest amount of distortion. Fuzz pedals exaggerate the amount of clipping in the signal to the point where it can sound like your gear is malfunctioning. These pedals where heavily used in the 60’s in psychedelic Rock and Roll.


Reverb Pedals

To completely understand what reverb pedals are let's talk about what reverb is. Reverb happens when sound hits a hard surface and reflects back to the listener at different times and amplitudes to create a multitude of overlapping echoes, which carry information about that physical space. Reverb pedals exaggerate or simulate reverberation that would happen naturally.


Delay Pedals

Delay is an effect that is created when an audio signal is recorded and then played back after a certain period of time. Delay pedals do this by recording your guitar notes and playing them back at the interval you choose by using the controls on the pedal. It can also play the note back once or multiple times depending on your settings.


Looper Pedals

These may not technically be considered an effect pedal but these are an amazing tool for any guitar player to have in their arsenal of pedals. These pedals allow you record yourself playing for a certain amount of time and then the pedal will play it back and continuously loop it. You can also stack loops on top of one another so if you wanted to you could be a one man band.


Wah Pedals

Wah pedals are effects pedals that alters the tone and frequencies of the signal to create a sound that mimics the sound of a human voice making the sound “wah-wah” by moving the foot back and forth on the pedal. These pedals are also the reason behind the “wacka-wacka” sound that is popular in funk styled guitar playing.


EQ Pedals

EQ pedals are equalizers. They are made to be able to fine tune the frequencies you are wanting to have stand out in your sound (treble, mid range, and bass). You do this by moving the knobs to either increase or decrease the amounts of each of the frequencies to truly tune your sound to where you want it to be or completely flatten your sound if that's what you want.


Talk Box Pedals

Talk box pedals are effects units that allow the musician to modify the sound of a musical instrument by using a flexible tube to take the output of a small speaker and transmit it into the mouth. Using your mouth as if you're talking, you can shape the frequency of the sound and apply speech sounds to the sounds of the instrument. Any time you have heard a guitar “sing” this is pedal responsible.


Chorus Pedals

Have you ever wanted your guitar to sound like a 2 guitars, or 5? If you said yes then this is the pedal for you. These pedals will make it sound like you have another guitar playing with you but slightly out of time with you. Chorus pedals are a lot of fun to experiment with there are a lot of different sounds you can get with these especially if you have other effects pedals in front of it.


Phaser Pedals

Phaser pedals are another example of a pedals that you have to know the science around before you can truly understand what these pedals are doing. A phaser is an electronic filter that works by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum. The position of the filtered frequencies of the waveform being affected is typically modulated so that they vary over time, creating a sweeping effect. This effect can sound like a speaker that is moving further away and then closer to you over and over again. With the phaser pedal you have control of how far the “speaker” is traveling away from you and how fast it is moving.


Flanger Pedals

Flanger pedals are similar to phasers in the way they sound but the effect is simpler to understand. The effect is made by mixing two identical signals together with one signal being delayed by a small and gradually changing period. This effect will give the classic “swooshing” effect that has been used in many popular songs since the 1950’s.


Volume Pedals

Volume pedals are exactly what you would think they would be, a volume control. The pedal makes it so you can control the volume using your foot instead of the volume knob on your guitar. Using this pedal does not affect the tone of your guitar it only changes the signal.


Tremolo Pedals

The name tremolo might confuse some guitar players because you might think that this pedal emulates the sound of a tremolo bar but instead of effecting the pitch tremolo pedals create their effect by affecting the volume of you signal. These pedals alter the signal of the guitar sound so the volume is going up and down at the rate of speed you choose.


Octave Pedals

Octave pedals are a type of effects unit that mixes the input signal with a synthesized signal which the tone is an octave lower or higher than the original tone. It makes it seem as if as when you are playing there is someone playing exactly what you are playing but an octave higher (or lower) at the same time as you.


Tuner Pedals

Tuner pedals are something every guitar player needs. These pedals allow you quickly tune up during a performance. By engaging the pedal your signal will be muted to your amp and you will have a visual aid (a meter or a series of lights) to help you accurately tune your


Pitch Shift Pedals

Pitch shift pedals make it so you can manipulate the pitch of the note you're fretting on your guitar. The pedal emulates sounds that a guitarist normally makes using the tremolo "whammy" bar on the guitar, but with a greatly enhanced pitch range and without tuning hassles associated with using the tremolo bar. Many can also be used to produce harmonies to the notes you're playing


Compressor Pedals

Compressor pedals are another great tool to have on your board. These pedals allow you to reduce the dynamics (the loud to soft ratio) of your playing. They can even be set to make ever note the same volume. Compressors can be used to accentuate the pick attack on the string, or to increase the sustain of your notes.


Noise Gate Pedals

Are you running a bunch of high gain pedals, have noisy pickups, or just have a hum coming out of your amp? If so maybe a noise gate pedal is something you should look into. These pedals will help get rid of the unwanted hiss or hum out of your amp. These pedals are very helpful but can also be tricky to use properly. If you do end up having one you will probably have to do some tweaking to make sure your tone that you like isn't changed when using this pedal.


Acoustic Simulator Pedals

Acoustic Simulator Pedals are pedals that will turn your electric guitar into a very convincing sounding acoustic guitar. It may not be able to make your Paul Reed Smith Custom 24 sound like a Taylor 714 but it will get the job done in a quick pinch.



Acoustic guitar- a style of guitar that does not require electrical amplification, having a hollow body that amplifies the vibrations of the strings.

 

Action- In the guitar and similar instruments, the action is the distance between the fretboard and the string, This determines how easy it is to sound notes when pressure is applied by your finger; the open space between strings and frets

Amplifier- an electronic device or system that strengthens the electrical signal from the pickup on a guitar to produce sound through speakers.

 

Arpeggio- notes from a chord played individually instead of strummed together. These are sometimes called a broken chord.


Barre chord- a type of chord played on a string instrument that requires the player to use their forefinger as a capo (see Capo below) to play chords in a different shape.

Bending- the act of physically bending the string on a guitar up or down on the fretboard to raise the pitch of the note.

Body- The main part of the guitar. The body is large and hollow on an acoustic to amplify the sound. On an electric it is usually solid but can also be semi-hollow or hollow.

Bolt-on neck- A style of guitar construction where the neck and body are held together by screws and bolts.


Bracing- the system of wooden struts which internally support and reinforce the inside of a hollow body instrument

Bridge- a device that supports the strings on a stringed instrument that transmits the vibration of those strings to another part of the instrument.

Capo- A mechanical barre that attaches to the neck of the guitar to raise the key of the entire guitar.

 

Chord- multiple notes played simultaneously as a basis of harmony.


Chord progression- a harmonic succession of chords.

Cutaway- A concave area generally in the upper right bout of a normal right-hand guitar that allows the player easier access to the high frets.

Downstroke- a technique used by stringed instrument musicians in which the player uses the pick (or plectrum) in a downward motion on the strings.

Effects pedal- an electric device (footswitch or pedal) that will change the way your guitar sounds when activated (see “Pedals” tab for more information).


F-hole- an “f” shaped sound hole that is normally associated with violins, but is commonly used on semi-hollow body and hollowbody electric guitars to transmit the sound from the internal body of the instrument.

Fingerboard- the front of the guitar neck that holds the frets. The part of the guitar where your non picking (fretting) hand plays.

 

Finger picking- the act of using your fingers as the picking device instead of a pick (plectrum).

Finger picks- individual plectrums which attach directly to the fingers that work as a long fingernail. You will see these commonly used in fingerstyle, classical guitar, and banjo players.


Fingerstyle- see finger picking

Flatpicking- the style of of playing when the player is using a guitar pick to play the strings.

Fret- the vertical metal bars on a stringed instrument that correspond to a half step difference in pitch.

Fretboard- see fingerboard.


Guitar strap- a piece of fabric that is worn to keep your guitar supported while standing.

Hammer-on- making a note sound from a guitar by sharply putting a fretting- hand finger down on the fingerboard.

Harmonic- is a musical note played by preventing or amplifying vibration of certain overtones of a guitar string.

 

Headstock- the section of the guitar that is at the top of the neck which houses the machine heads (tuners).


Hollowbody guitar- a guitar with a completely hollow body. Most electric hollowbody guitars have an arched top and “f” holes. They offer more reverberation than semi-hollow body guitars.

 

Humbucker- a type of electric guitar pickup (also refereed to as a double coil) that uses two coils to cancel out the interference or “buck the hum” picked up by coil pickups. These types of pickups are known to have a warmer or “thicker” tone than single-coil pickups.

Inlay- decorative materials set into the wood of a guitar.

 

 

 

Lick- parts of a song the lead guitar plays that are used as fills.


Machine head- also known as tuners, are the part of the guitar on the headstock where you can tune your strings by adjusting the tension.

Neck- the part of the guitar that the strings are stretched over. The neck holds the frets, fingerboard, truss rod, and headstock.

Neck radius- the curvature of the fingerboard across the neck measured in inches or millimeters. This higher the number, the flatter the fingerboard will be.

Neck through body- a method in guitar construction that uses one piece of wood for the neck and extends into the body.


Neck width- the width of a guitar neck measured from the top string to the bottom string.

Nut- a small piece of hard material that supports the strings at the end of the neck close to the headstock.

Octave- the interval between one music pitch and another that is exactly double the frequency.

Open chord- guitar chords that include one or more open strings when being played.


Palm muting- a playing technique for guitar playing that includes resting the side of your picking hand against the strings while strumming thus making a muted effect.

Pickguard- a piece of material that is under the strings on the body of the guitar that will protect the finish from being scratched by the pick.

Pickup- a transducer that takes the vibrations that are played from the strings and converts them into an electrical signal that is amplified by you amplifier.

Plectrum- commonly known as a guitar pick, it is a piece of material that is used to pluck the strings on a string instrument.


Pots- an abbreviated term for potentiometer, these are used to control a variety of functions such as volume and tone.

Pull-off- switching from a higher note to a lower note on the same string by pulling the fretting hand’s finger off the higher note. A pull-off can be considered the opposite of a. hammer-on

Purfling- the narrow decorative edge inlaid into the top or back of a stringed instrument

Riff- a repeated phrase in music that can include chords and individual notes.


Saddle- a piece of hard material put into the bridge of the guitar to support the strings on the guitar. The way you adjust the saddles can affect action and intonation.

Scale length- the length of the nut to the bridge.

Scalloped fretboard- instead of the fretboard being flat, the fretboard is concave between each fret. This means your finger will not touch the fretboard when you fret a note.

Semi-hollow body- instead of being completely hollow or solid the body is only partially hollowed out. This can provide many of the benefits of both hollow body and solid body guitars.


Set neck- a style of guitar construction where the neck is connected to the body at the dovetail joint with adhesive.

Slide- a tube usually made from glass or metal used that is worn on the finger and used to slide against the strings while keeping pressure on the fretboard.

Solid body- a guitar that is completely solid. There is no sound holes or any type of internal reverberation.

Sound hole- the hole (usually in the center) of an acoustic guitar to transmit the sound.

 


Strumming- the act of playing multiple notes with one smooth motion in a rhythmic pattern.

Sweep picking- playing multiple individual notes with one single strum of the picking hand. This is different than playing a chord because each note is sounded out separately.

Tapping- a guitar technique that uses a series of hammer-ons and pull-offs by the fretting hand along with hammer-ons by the picking hand.

Tremolo Bar- see vibrato bar


Truss rod- a metal rod that runs through the neck of the guitar to counterbalance the tension of the strings. This can be adjusted to change the action of the neck.

Upstroke- a strum that performed by playing the highest pitched string first up to the lowest string.

Vibrato bar- a bar that is attached to the bridge of electric guitars which you can push and pull on to fluctuate the pitch of the notes being played.



PRS INFO

PRIVATE STOCK CATALOG

To learn everything you need to know about the Private Stock program click HERE!


PRS NECK PROFILES EXPLAINED

Here's the "Go-To" page that explains everything about Paul Reed Smith Neck Profiles. Check it out HERE!


PRS MODEL HISTORY

Click HERE to see the history of all the Paul Reed Smith models.


PRS PRIVATE STOCK

Some of the best craftsmanship and creativity comes out of the PRS Private Stock Department. Click HERE to learn about these amazing guitars.


CARE AND MAINTENANCE TIPS

Learn from the Pros at Moore Guitars and the Paul Reed Smith Factory on how to care for your guitar. Click HERE!


PRS SWITCHING POSITIONS

An in-depth Look at the switching positions and configurations on all the Paul Reed Smith Guitars.

Video Included!

Click HERE!


TAYLOR INFO

TAYLOR RESTRINGING METHOD

Straight from the luthiers at Taylor Guitars, the Taylor method of restringing your prized acoustic guitar. Click HERE!


An EXTREMELY helpful guide to picking your first, or your next Taylor Guitar. Click HERE to check it out!


Click HERE to see the new and amazing bracing system from Taylor that is revolutionizing the way Taylor Guitars are built and sound!


Here is a great overview page about the Taylor Bracing System. The amazing tone of Taylor Guitars has been generated from this platform for decades. Click HERE!


TAYLOR HUMIDIFICATION GUIDELINES

The luthiers from Taylor Guitars tell us how to keep your acoustic guitar properly hydrated throughout the year. Click HERE!


TAYLOR ES-1 EXPRESSION SYSTEM

Read HERE to learn about the ES (1) Expression System from Taylor Guitars.


TAYLOR ES-2 EXPRESSION SYSTEM

Read HERE to learn about the upgraded ES-2 Expression System from Taylor Guitars.


The amazingly well-designed Taylor Neck is an engineering marvel. Its ease to adjust and its stability make it another feather in Taylor's cap. Click HERE to read about it.


A GUIDE TO TAYLOR SERIAL NUMBERS

A concise guide to understanding the serial numbering system for Taylor Guitars dating back to the beginning. Click HERE!


TAYLOR GUITARS FACTORY STRINGS

Click HERE to learn about the strings that come on your new Taylor Guitar.  


Bob Taylor and Taylor Guitars have always been concerned for the environment. Their efforts are amazing in this respect. Click HERE to see an overview of what they do to save our wonderful planet.


It's taylor like you have never heard before! Click HERE to see and learn everything you need to know about the "Taylor Grand Pacifics" and why they are such amazing guitars!


FENDER INFO

FENDER DATING AND SERIAL NUMBERS

Here's the "Go-To" page that explains everything about dating your Fender Guitar. No, not that kind of dating...Figuring out the year of your guitar, silly. Check it out HERE!


Fender helps you decide which stratocaster are right for your playing. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Here is a quick reference page dedicated to the illustrious history of the Fender Guitar Company. Click HERE!


Fender helps you decide which strings are right for your playing and your guitar. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you on how to buy an electric guitar. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you choose the pickup that's right for you. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you to understand what a set up is and why it is important . Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender helps you to understand what a set up is and why it is important . Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender compares 7 types of Stratocasters for you. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!


Fender describes the difference between gain and volume. Click HERE to get the scoop from the folks that know!

BREEDLOVE INFO

BREEDLOVE TONEWOOD
CERTIFICATION

Click HERE to learn about how the people at Breedlove source their tonewoods responsibly to help conserve our planet!


Click HERE to learn about how the people at Breedlove source their tonewoods responsibly to help conserve our planet!


EXPERT REVIEW

Welcome to the Expert Review section. Here you will find our light hearted yet very informative videos covering everything you need to know about the products that come through our store.  

PRS

SE Paul's Guitar

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS SE Paul's Guitar


SE Tonare Series

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS SE Tonare Series


John Mayer Silver Sky

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS John Mayer Silver Sky


PRS Private Stock McCarty Doubleneck 594 Semi-Hollow

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS Private Stock McCarty Doubleneck 594 Semi-Hollow


Archon 50W EL34 Head

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the PRS Archon 50W EL34 Head


TAYLOR

Taylor 717E Builders Edition Grand Pacific

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor 717E Builders Edition Grand Pacific


Taylor 114E

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor 114E


Taylor Grand Pacific Demo

CLICK HERE to see Taylor Guitars' Rich Casciato demo the Grand Pacific series


TAYLOR 814 CE

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor 814CE


Taylor GS Mini

CLICK HERE to see what what we have to say about the Taylor GS Mini


FENDER

Jimmy Page Mirror Telecaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender Jimmy Page Mirror Telecaster


American Professional Stratocaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender American Professional Stratocaster


American Elite Stratocaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender American Elite Stratocaster


Eric Johnson Thinline Stratocaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender Eric Johnson Thinline Stratocaster


American Elite Thinline Telecaster

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Fender American Elite Telecaster Thinline


BREEDLOVE

Breedlove Oregon Concertina E Myrtlewood

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove Oregon Concertina E Myrtlewood


Breedlove Frontier Concert E Mahogany

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove Frontier Concert Mahogany


Breedlove Premier Concert CE Moore LTD

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove Premier Concert CE Moore LTD


Breedlove USA Concertina E Mahogany

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove USA Concertina E Mahogany


Breedlove Premier Jumbo

CLICK HERE to see what we have to say about the Breedlove Premier Jumbo


BEGINNING BUYERS VIDEO

VIDEO FOR BEGINNING BUYERS

Check out this video brought to you from Ed Sein. He has 30 years of experience helping people getting started playing guitar.

Click HERE!

PEDALS

In this section of the Moore Guitars Knowledge Page we are discussing the different types of guitar effects pedals. There are many different types, and we are going to dive into them one by one. If you have any further questions feel free to give us a call or live chat us.

GAIN EFFECTS

Distortion Pedals

Let's start of with probably the most widely used type of effects pedals out there, distortion! If you are really wanting to make your tone crunchy and more aggressive distortion pedals are definitely the place to start. These pedals give you the ability to heavily clip the clean signal that you are running through your amp and give you the high-gain tone that you would hear in your favorite heavy rock or metal band.


Overdrive Pedals

Another very popular type of pedal that you will see on nearly every pedal board is the overdrive pedal. These pedals are another form of gain pedal like the distortion and fuzz pedals. These pedals provide the natural distortion you would normally hear in your amp when you turn up the gain to the point that the signal is clipping. Overdrive pedals are great if you are wanting to have a natural-sounding distorted sound without damaging your hearing or equipment. Overdrive pedals generally provide less clipping than regular distortion pedals.


Boost Pedals

Another very popular type of pedal that you will see on nearly every pedal board is the overdrive pedal. These pedals are another form of gain pedal like the distortion and fuzz pedals. These pedals provide the natural distortion you would normally hear in your amp when you turn up the gain to the point that the signal is clipping. Overdrive pedals are great if you are wanting to have a natural-sounding distorted sound without damaging your hearing or equipment. Overdrive pedals generally provide less clipping than regular distortion pedals.


Fuzz Pedal

Another very popular type of pedal that you will see on nearly every pedal board is the overdrive pedal. These pedals are another form of gain pedal like the distortion and fuzz pedals. These pedals provide the natural distortion you would normally hear in your amp when you turn up the gain to the point that the signal is clipping. Overdrive pedals are great if you are wanting to have a natural-sounding distorted sound without damaging your hearing or equipment. Overdrive pedals generally provide less clipping than regular distortion pedals.


TIME EFFECTS

Reverb Pedals

To completely understand what reverb pedals are let's talk about what reverb is. Reverb happens when sound hits a hard surface and reflects back to the listener at different times and amplitudes to create a multitude of overlapping echoes, which carry information about that physical space. Reverb pedals exaggerate or simulate reverberation that would happen naturally.


Delay Pedals

Delay is an effect that is created when an audio signal is recorded and then played back after a certain period of time. Delay pedals do this by recording your guitar notes and playing them back at the interval you choose by using the controls on the pedal. It can also play the note back once or multiple times depending on your settings.


Looper Pedals

These may not technically be considered an effect pedal but these are an amazing tool for any guitar player to have in their arsenal of pedals. These pedals allow you record yourself playing for a certain amount of time and then the pedal will play it back and continuously loop it. You can also stack loops on top of one another so if you wanted to you could be a one man band.


FILTER EFFECTS

Wah Pedal

 

Wah pedals are effects pedals that alters the tone and frequencies of the signal to create a sound that mimics the sound of a human voice making the sound “wah-wah” by moving the foot back and forth on the pedal. These pedals are also the reason behind the “wacka-wacka” sound that is popular in funk styled guitar playing.


EQ Pedals

EQ pedals are equalizers. They are made to be able to fine tune the frequencies you are wanting to have stand out in your sound (treble, mid range, and bass). You do this by moving the knobs to either increase or decrease the amounts of each of the frequencies to truly tune your sound to where you want it to be or completely flatten your sound if that's what you want.


Talk Box Pedals

Talk box pedals are effects units that allow the musician to modify the sound of a musical instrument by using a flexible tube to take the output of a small speaker and transmit it into the mouth. Using your mouth as if you're talking, you can shape the frequency of the sound and apply speech sounds to the sounds of the instrument. Any time you have heard a guitar “sing” this is pedal responsible.


MODULATION EFFECTS

Chorus Pedals

Have you ever wanted your guitar to sound like a 2 guitars, or 5? If you said yes then this is the pedal for you. These pedals will make it sound like you have another guitar playing with you but slightly out of time with you. Chorus pedals are a lot of fun to experiment with there are a lot of different sounds you can get with these especially if you have other effects pedals in front of it.


Phaser Pedals

Phaser pedals are another example of a pedals that you have to know the science around before you can truly understand what these pedals are doing. A phaser is an electronic filter that works by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum. The position of the filtered frequencies of the waveform being affected is typically modulated so that they vary over time, creating a sweeping effect. This effect can sound like a speaker that is moving further away and then closer to you over and over again. With the phaser pedal you have control of how far the “speaker” is traveling away from you and how fast it is moving.


Flanger Pedal

Flanger pedals are similar to phasers in the way they sound but the effect is simpler to understand. The effect is made by mixing two identical signals together with one signal being delayed by a small and gradually changing period. This effect will give the classic “swooshing” effect that has been used in many popular songs since the 1950’s.


VOLUME EFFECTS

Volume Pedals

Volume pedals are exactly what you would think they would be, a volume control. The pedal makes it so you can control the volume using your foot instead of the volume knob on your guitar. Using this pedal does not affect the tone of your guitar it only changes the signal.


Tremolo Pedal

The name tremolo might confuse some guitar players because you might think that this pedal emulates the sound of a tremolo bar but instead of effecting the pitch tremolo pedals create their effect by affecting the volume of you signal. These pedals alter the signal of the guitar sound so the volume is going up and down at the rate of speed you choose.

 


PITCH EFFECTS

Octave Pedals

Octave pedals are a type of effects unit that mixes the input signal with a synthesized signal which the tone is an octave lower or higher than the original tone. It makes it seem as if as when you are playing there is someone playing exactly what you are playing but an octave higher (or lower) at the same time as you.


Tuner Pedal

Tuner pedals are something every guitar player needs. These pedals allow you quickly tune up during a performance. By engaging the pedal your signal will be muted to your amp and you will have a visual aid (a meter or a series of lights) to help you accurately tune your guitar.


Pitch Shift Pedals

Pitch shift pedals make it so you can manipulate the pitch of the note you're fretting on your guitar. The pedal emulates sounds that a guitarist normally makes using the tremolo "whammy" bar on the guitar, but with a greatly enhanced pitch range and without tuning hassles associated with using the tremolo bar. Many can also be used to produce harmonies to the notes you're playing


COMPRESSOR

Compressor Pedals

Compressor pedals are another great tool to have on your board. These pedals allow you to reduce the dynamics (the loud to soft ratio) of your playing. They can even be set to make every note the same volume. Compressors can be used to accentuate the pick attack on the string, or to increase the sustain of your notes.

 


NOISE GATE

Noise Gate Pedals

Are you running a bunch of high gain pedals, have noisy pickups, or just have a hum coming out of your amp? If so maybe a noise gate pedal is something you should look into. These pedals will help get rid of the unwanted hiss or hum out of your amp. These pedals are very helpful but can also be tricky to use properly. If you do end up having one you will probably have to do some tweaking to make sure your tone that you like isn't changed when using this pedal.

 


OTHER

Acoustic Simulator Pedals

Acoustic Simulator Pedals are pedals that will turn your electric guitar into a very convincing sounding acoustic guitar. It may not be able to make your Paul Reed Smith Custom 24 sound like a Taylor 714 but it will get the job done in a quick pinch.


GLOSSARY

A-E


Acoustic guitar- a style of guitar that does not require electrical amplification, having a hollow body that amplifies the vibrations of the strings.


Action- In the guitar and similar instruments, the action is the distance between the fretboard and the string, This determines how easy it is to sound notes when pressure is applied by your finger; the open space between strings and frets.


Amplifier- an electronic device or system that strengthens the electrical signal from the pickup on a guitar to produce sound through speakers.


Arpeggio- notes from a chord played individually instead of strummed together. These are sometimes called a broken chord.


Barre chord- a type of chord played on a string instrument that requires the player to use their forefinger as a capo (see Capo below) to play chords in a different shape.


Bending- the act of physically bending the string on a guitar up or down on the fretboard to raise the pitch of the note.


Body- The main part of the guitar. The body is large and hollow on an acoustic to amplify the sound. On an electric it is usually solid but can also be semi-hollow or hollow.


Bolt-on neck- A style of guitar construction where the neck and body are held together by screws and bolt


Bracing- the system of wooden struts which internally support and reinforce the inside of a hollow body instrument.


Bridge- a device that supports the strings on a stringed instrument that transmits the vibration of those strings to another part of the instrument.


Capo- A mechanical barre that attaches to the neck of the guitar to raise the key of the entire guitar.


Chord- multiple notes played simultaneously as a basis of harmony.


Chord progression- a harmonic succession of chords.


Cutaway- A concave area generally in the upper right bout of a normal right-hand guitar that allows the player easier access to the high frets.


Downstroke- a technique used by stringed instrument musicians in which the player uses the pick (or plectrum) in a downward motion on the strings.


Effects pedal- an electric device (footswitch or pedal) that will change the way your guitar sounds when activated (see “Pedals” tab for more information).


F-I


F-hole- an “f” shaped sound hole that is normally associated with violins, but is commonly used on semi-hollow body and hollowbody electric guitars to transmit the sound from the internal body of the instrument.


Fingerboard- the front of the guitar neck that holds the frets. The part of the guitar where your non picking (fretting) hand plays.


Finger picking- the act of using your fingers as the picking device instead of a pick (plectrum).


Finger picks- individual plectrums which attach directly to the fingers that work as a long fingernail. You will see these commonly used in fingerstyle, classical guitar, and banjo players.


Fingerstyle- see finger picking


Flatpicking- the style of of playing when the player is using a guitar pick to play the strings.


Fret- the vertical metal bars on a stringed instrument that correspond to a half step difference in pitch.


Fretboard- see fingerboard.


Guitar strap- a piece of fabric that is worn to keep your guitar supported while standing.


Hammer-on- making a note sound from a guitar by sharply putting a fretting- hand finger down on the fingerboard.


Harmonic- is a musical note played by preventing or amplifying vibration of certain overtones of a guitar string.


Headstock- the section of the guitar that is at the top of the neck which houses the machine heads (tuners).


Hollowbody guitar- a guitar with a completely hollow body. Most electric hollowbody guitars have an arched top and “f” holes. They offer more reverberation than semi-hollow body guitars.


Humbucker- a type of electric guitar pickup (also refereed to as a double coil) that uses two coils to cancel out the interference or “buck the hum” picked up by coil pickups. These types of pickups are known to have a warmer or “thicker” tone than single-coil pickups.


Inlay- decorative materials set into the wood of a guitar.


L-P


Lick- parts of a song the lead guitar plays that are used as fills.


Machine head- also known as tuners, are the part of the guitar on the headstock where you can tune your strings by adjusting the tension.


Neck- the part of the guitar that the strings are stretched over. The neck holds the frets, fingerboard, truss rod, and headstock.


Neck radius- the curvature of the fingerboard across the neck measured in inches or millimeters. This higher the number, the flatter the fingerboard will be.


Neck through body- a method in guitar construction that uses one piece of wood for the neck and extends into the body.


Neck width- the width of a guitar neck measured from the top string to the bottom string.


Nut- a small piece of hard material that supports the strings at the end of the neck close to the headstock.


Octave- the interval between one music pitch and another that is exactly double the frequency.


Open chord- guitar chords that include one or more open strings when being played.


Palm muting- a playing technique for guitar playing that includes resting the side of your picking hand against the strings while strumming thus making a muted effect.


Pickguard- a piece of material that is under the strings on the body of the guitar that will protect the finish from being scratched by the pick.


Pickup- a transducer that takes the vibrations that are played from the strings and converts them into an electrical signal that is amplified by you amplifier.


Plectrum- commonly known as a guitar pick, it is a piece of material that is used to pluck the strings on a string instrument.


Pots- an abbreviated term for potentiometer, these are used to control a variety of functions such as volume and tone.


Pull-off- switching from a higher note to a lower note on the same string by pulling the fretting hand’s finger off the higher note. A pull-off can be considered the opposite of a. hammer-on


Purfling- the narrow decorative edge inlaid into the top or back of a stringed instrument.


R-Z


Riff- a repeated phrase in music that can include chords and individual notes.


Saddle- a piece of hard material put into the bridge of the guitar to support the strings on the guitar. The way you adjust the saddles can affect action and intonation.


Scale length- the length of the nut to the bridge.


Scalloped fretboard- instead of the fretboard being flat, the fretboard is concave between each fret. This means your finger will not touch the fretboard when you fret a note.

 


Semi-hollow body- instead of being completely hollow or solid the body is only partially hollowed out. This can provide many of the benefits of both hollow body and solid body guitars.


Set neck- a style of guitar construction where the neck is connected to the body at the dovetail joint with adhesive.


Slide- a tube usually made from glass or metal used that is worn on the finger and used to slide against the strings while keeping pressure on the fretboard.


Solid body- a guitar that is completely solid. There is no sound holes or any type of internal reverberation.


Sound hole- the hole (usually in the center) of an acoustic guitar to transmit the sound.


Strumming- the act of playing multiple notes with one smooth motion in a rhythmic pattern.


Sweep picking- playing multiple individual notes with one single strum of the picking hand. This is different than playing a chord because each note is sounded out separately.


Tapping- a guitar technique that uses a series of hammer-ons and pull-offs by the fretting hand along with hammer-ons by the picking hand.


Tremolo Bar- see vibrato bar


Truss rod- a metal rod that runs through the neck of the guitar to counterbalance the tension of the strings. This can be adjusted to change the action of the neck.


Upstroke- a strum that performed by playing the highest pitched string first up to the lowest string.


Vibrato bar- a bar that is attached to the bridge of electric guitars which you can push and pull on to fluctuate the pitch of the notes being played.